Deering Wildflower Acres

Ok, I get excited over the littlest of things. Especially new discoveries! Today, I had an hour to spare and was headed for another trail in Ebey Slough, but I was flooded out due to recent rains. So I did a little googling and found a spot I’d never heard of before, and it happened to be minutes from my work.

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Deering Wildflower Acres is a neat little nature trail smack dab in the middle of a development in that spot between Marysville and Lake Stevens. It’s not your typical littered, over ran by neighborhood kids, suburban wasteland. Rather, it’s a space created for learning and enjoying a little slice of nature.

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When I arrived to the parking area at the end of a dead end road I was thrilled to see that I was the only one there. Some amenities were an outhouse and a couple of picnic tables. Be sure, if you check this one out, to grab a brochure provided at the trailhead. It includes a handy map and a little info on some of the plant life you’ll see.

I was grinning ear to ear as I pounced down the trail, choosing to veer left to get to what appeared on the map to be a pond. Sure enough after a short distance I found a nice bench that looks out over a lively little pond. The view is a tad obstructed by overgrowth, but still a nice little spot to find some zen. Especially since nobody was around.

I ended up exploring every inch of the trail system and enjoyed finding signs that identified different plants and trees. You couldn’t get lost in there due to an ample amount of maps throughout, but it is definitely a quick escape if you don’t have a lot of time or don’t want to venture too far.

My thinking is that this is a trail you’ll want to visit each season to really capture the evolution of scenery and appreciate fully what has been accomplished here. As, this parcel was carved out in 1968 as a survey site for Biologists from Western Washington University to study the effects of municipal development on wetland ecosystems. A couple, Tam and Ivan Deering spearheaded the entire project by purchasing the 20 acres of land and then later gifting it to the Nature Conservancy. Now it is maintained by the city of Marysville. What a cool find!

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Here is the address, if you care to check it out:

4708 79th Ave. N.E., Marysville

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